Gold Rush

Image from Charles Neal Interiors Atlanta, GA

Precious metals have always been apart of Interiors. They add texture and grandeur to any room. Metalics layer our homes with a certain sophistication and a definate style direction. For the last 10-15 years people have tried hard to get rid of shinny brass and golds, working in the sterling slivers and pewter into their spaces.  Then there was a change in direction to the almost black ~ oil rubbed bronze. While trends and fashions come in waves and everyone will always have their preferences, gold is upon the design scene in a big way! When elements in design come back, as they always do, they are usually introduced to us in a fresh way. Patterns that were predominate in the 1970’s and 80”s such as houndstooth, chevron, Ikat, and flame stitch have been brought back to life with a whole new color palette and a much bolder scale.

Fabric top Left to bottom right:black houdstooth:shutterstock, yellow houdstooth: Lee Jofa, Flame stitch:Dash & Albert, Chevron: Robert Allen

Gold is no exception. There are still shinny golds out there, but added to that are gold items with lots of texture, mirrored or weathered, and golds with a more yellow hue. Interior Design and Fashion go hand and hand. Their trends usually follow each other. 

Some gold accents mimic the overstated gold jewlry of the Bohemian style. Big loops and exaggerated patterns adorn an outfit and a room with a powerful punch.

Jewelry from Strike Envy

Cube and Ring Table from: Worlds Away

Sideboard from: Davidson London

The best designs have embraced gold in small, meaningful doses, layering several metals adding warmth and depth to the space. This look can be successful carried out and made to feel more real and lived in. Nothing is too matchy, but more personalized. So where could you use more gold? I can hardly believe that I own gold earings again. And now I will consider a lamp or even mirror to warm a room. The combinations are limitless. Just like jewlry, try it on and see what feels good.

 Image: Design Interventions, Rebecca Robinson